Frequently Asked Questions...and Answers

ISN'T BKK "JUST DIRT"?

 

One of West Covina’s Councilman continues to describe the BKK landfills as “just dirt.”  Actually that’s completely wrong and uninformed.

 

There are eight regulatory agencies with responsibilities at BKK.  Two of those agencies are the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and California Department of Fish and Wildlife.  They are involved at BKK precisely because it is NOT "just dirt."

 

The land on and adjacent to BKK is a huge wildlife reservoir and rich habitat for dozens of species of animals and plentiful native California vegetation.  This land is home to abundant wildlife such as Gray Fox, Bobcat, Deer, 3 species of squirrel, other mammals, native snakes and other reptiles, and a huge variety of birds such as the endangered California Gnatcatcher, Great Horned Owl, Red Tail Hawk, Coopers Hawk, Greater Roadrunner, Turkey Vulture, Western Scrub Jay, Nuttall’s Woodpecker, Wren, California Thrasher, Spotted Towhee, California Towhee, Black-Headed Grosbeak, Quail, Hummingbird (4 species), and seasonally Cedar Waxwing, Robin, and Western Tanager just to name a few. 

 

How is this possible?  

 

BKK is part of a much larger wildlife reservoir and corridor.  The open space and habitat at BKK connects to open space and habitat in Walnut.  This is turn connects to open space and habitat on the campus of Mt. San Antonio College, which turn connects to open space and habitat on the campus of Cal Poly Pomona.  There are even small connection points from land that begins at BKK all the way to Bonelli Regional Park in San Dimas.  

 

Some of this land at BKK includes woodlands of protected Southern California Black Walnut Trees as well as abundant Toyon, Coastal Live Oak, Lemonade Berry, California Buckwheat, and other native California vegetation.

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The photographs below are of the land at BKK that Singpoli has proposed developing.  These were taken on April 11, 2018